TheBeatles-Collection.com welcomes you!

Published May 1st, 2007 | Edit |

This is the British vinyl records collection of The Beatles. The owner of this site is sure that this site will provide lots of useful information for people interested in collecting of the Beatles vinyl. Information - is the main purpose of the site. All rights reserved copying, broadcasting and the publication of materials from this site is possible from the sanction of the owner of the site only. The collection will be always updated. Thank you very much for help to Vadim Legkovetc, Oleg Prokopov, Vladimir Morozov, Alexander Romanov, Andre Nolin, Cronverc. And many thank to all unknown to collectors for their help in creating this of this site.

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Mass Producing Records.

Published July 17th, 2011

Parlophone is a record label that was founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindström Company as Parlophon. The British branch was formed in 1923 as “Parlophone Records” which developed a reputation in the 1920s as a leading jazz label. In 1926, Columbia Graphophone Company acquired the Parlophone business, label name and its titles. Columbia Graphophone later became Columbia Records, and then EMI. The label’s fortunes began to rise in 1962, when George Martin signed rising new Liverpool band The Beatles. Along with fellow NEMS stablemates Cilla Black, Billy J. Kramer and the Fourmost, and contemporary Mancunian band The Hollies, The Beatles turned Parlophone into one of the world’s most famous and prestigious record labels.

ParlophoneParlophone

EMI manufactured records at factory at Hayes in Middlesex, a town in London Borough of Hillington located near Heathrow Airport. The Hayes factory began pressing 45-rpm singles and 33 1/3-rpm long-playing vinyl records in October 1952. The pressing machines used by EMI at Hayes at the time the Beatles first signed with Parlophone were built by the Cramophone Company in the thirties. During the early sixties, EMI had approximately 120 presses. If all the machines were running, the factory could manufacture approximately 120,000 records a day. Although some factories changed stampers after press run of as little as 300 records, EMI did not change stampers that frequently. Stampers would be replaced when they were no longer capable of producing a quality-sounding disc. During the sixties, EMI cut the lacquers for Beatles singles, albums and EP on Scully lathes at Abbey Road. Lacquers were used to create the metal parts needed for manufacturing records. Each side of the record has its own set of metal parts. The basic procedure has been in use for over one hundred years with only minor changes. EMI made its metal parts at its Hayes factory.

The soft master known as a “Lacquer” would then be electroplated with a metal, commonly a nickel alloy (this and all subsequent metal copies were known as “matrices” or singular “matrix”). When this metal was removed from the Lacquer, it was a copy of the Lacquer and of the yet to be produced record. In the UK, the copy from the lacquer was called the “Master”. In the earliest days the Master was used as a mold to press records sold to the public, but as demand for mass production of records grew, another step was added to the process.
The metal Master was then electroplated to create “Mothers”. From the “Mothers”, “Stampers” would be formed. The Stampers would be used in hydraulic presses to mould the LP discs. The advantages of this system over the earlier more direct system included ability to make a large number of records quickly by using multiple stampers. Also, more records could be produced from each Master since molds would eventually wear out.
Since the Master was the unique source made to ultimately produce the Stampers, it was considered a Library Item. The “Pedigree” of any record can be traced through the Mother/Stamper identities used, by reading the lettering found on the record run-out area.

Parlophone labels.

Published July 16th, 2011

The “Gold and Black” label design appeared on Parlophone LP labels from at least as far back as 1957 and bears a resemblance to the older 78 rpm labels. It was discontinued around May, 1963 at the latest. Black label with gold print with side numbers printed as: 1 and 2 used between autumn 1960 and April 1963. Before the spring of 1963, the stereo label had the same “Gold & Black” design as the mono label, although with stereo banner printed below the Parlophone logo.

When ‘Please Please Me’ was originally released Parlophone were in the process of updating the style of their record labels to appear more modern. The 7″ labels had been changed from red to black in January of 1963 and by May the LP’s gold and black scheme was changing to yellow and black. The ‘Yellow and Black’ label design which would remain throughout the 1960s. Almost immediately after the labels were changed from the Gold design to the Yellow, it was soon discovered that although the new labels featured the ’33 1/3′ prefix prominently above the Parlophone name, part of the label print plates were left unchanged whilst the transition was taking place. Because of this, the small ’33 1/3′ prefix that appeared to the right of the matrix number on the gold label remained. Since there was no need for the prefix to be included twice the smaller one was removed pretty much instantaneously after it’s discovery. This first black and yellow label without publishing year used a very short time: summer 1963 only. After April 1963 the stereo looked like the mono labels, except for the record number prefix and the word “STEREO” printed on the right side above the Parlophone logo. The stereo label changed follow the label changed for the mono LPs.

Parlophone started with a new re-designed label in 1963. It was black with a yellow logo and silver print. The publishing year was now printed on the label, as “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1963”. The beginning of the perimeter print was written with a fully capitalized THE PARLOPHONE CO LTD…”. This label used between summer 1963 and January 1964.

The text “SOLD IN U.K. SUBJECT TO RESALE PRICE CONDITIONS, SEE PRICE LISTS” was printed on EMI records between February 1964 and June 1969. This wording was supposed to be on UK releases only, but it also appears frequently on exported records. Black label with yellow logo and silver print with “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED…”, “THE PARLOPHONE” printed at the start of the perimeter print and with “SOLD IN U.K…” used between Fabruary 1964 and Jenuary 1965.

Parlophone started to print the publishing year as “(p) 1965” in early 1965. Label has “THE PARLOPHONE” printed at the start of the perimeter print and “SOLD IN U.K….” text. This label was in use for a relatively short period of time before the perimeter print was changed. The text “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED was removed from the label. It was originally believed that the “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED” text and “THE PARLOPHONE” rimtext were changed at the same time, but recently a very small number of stereo Beatles albums have emerged that show there was a slight delay between the introduction of the two. No mono copies with this feature have surfaced to date. Label used between January 1965 and summer1965.

The start of the perimeter print was changed to “THE GRAMOPHONE CO LTD…” in summer of 1965. Label has “THE GRAMOPHONE” printed at the start of the perimeter print, “SOLD IN U.K….” text and publishing year printed as: (p) 1966. This label used between summer 1965 and summer 1969.

Parlophone ceased to use different record numbers for stereo and mono releases in the early spring of 1966 and restarted the record number series at 7001.

The text “SOLD IN U.K. SUBJECT TO RESALE…” was removed from the label in summer 1969. Parlophone continued to use the “Black & Yellow” labels until November 1969. Label without “SOLD IN U.K. SUBJECT TO RESALE…” used between summer 1969 and November 1969.

Parlophone started to use a newly disigned label in late 1969. Parlophone radically changed their label design to this silver style with an EMI boxed logo at the bottom of the label, and the rim text now arches around the top of the label rather than underneath. This new label collectors refer to as the ‘Silver and Black’ design. The original label printer plates were used although the stereo mark was moved from the top to just above the catalogue number. It was thought many years ago that Parlophone had closed their mono back catalogue before the label design changed and as such no mono copies existed on this label, but over the years it’s transpired that three albums from the Beatles’ back catalogue had their mono runs extended slightly overlapping the transition. These three albums were “Please Please Me”, “Help!” and “Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band”. These mono presses are incredibly rare and very difficult to get your hands on. Label used between 1969 and early 1971.

Parlophone added another EMI logo at the top of the label in 1971. White EMI logo on a black background was changed to black EMI logo on a white background. This label used between early 1971 and 1973.

Parlophone temporarily ceased to release LPs in 1973 because of the oil crisis began. LPs production was moved to France for some time.

Parlophone resumed production LPs in 1976. The start of the perimeter print was changed to “EMI RECORDS LTD…”. The tex “GT. BRITAIN” was removed from the label. Instead, added “MADE IN GT. BRITAIN” text at the end of the perimeter print. This label used between summer 1976 and october 1980. To do this, EMI make new laqueurs at Abbey Road Studios. All albums were cut by Harry T. Moss. Therefore, the trail off area has its initials HTM. EMI reissued 13 Beatles stereo albums as a box set (Parlophone BC 13, in blue box) December 15, 1978.

In October 1980 the rimtext was again slightly altered so that it started with “ALL RIGHTS OF THE PRODUCER…”. Importantly, around the 11 ‘o’ clock position in the rimtext the wording is: “…UNAUTHORISED PUBLIC PERFORMANCE, BROADCASTING, COPYING AND HIRING…”. Instead, added “MANUFACTURED IN THE UK BY EMI RECORDS LIMITED” text at the end of the perimeter print. This label used between October 1980 and April 1984.

In summer 1981, EMI returned briefly in the 60’s design. Reappears yellow Parlophone logo on a black background. These Parlophone labels has around the 7 ‘o’ clock position in the rimtext the wording is: “…UNAUTHORISED PUBLIC PERFORMANCE, BROADCASTING, COPYING AND HIRING…”. EMI reissued the original 10 Beatles mono albums (8 albums on the Parlophone and 2 albums on the Apple) individually in July 1981, using, in most cases, original 1960s tube cuts. The LPs were distributed to department stores and record shops with a street date of 27 July 1981 (except Beatles For Sale and Yellow Submarine which were not available until a few weeks later) and were all sold by the end of 1981. In August 1982 EMI UK reissued these 10 Beatles mono albums as a box set (Parlophone BMC 10, in black box and in red box). And by then many of the LPs had received new solid state recuts by Harry T Moss.

EMI starts to make use of digital recording technology in 1981. This changes the matrix numbers on a longer (YEX  110-6-1-1-1) and removed stamper numbers. Later appear letter D (Digital) in the matrix numbers (for example YEX  179-6-1-3  D). The first time, digital technology is used in parallel with standard analog. So, sometimes on the one record, you can see the matrix numbers for the two different types.

At the end of spring 1984, the rimtext was again slightly altered. Importantly, around the 11 ‘o’ clock position in the rimtext the wording is: “UNAUTHORISED COPYING, HIRING, RENTING, PUBLIC PERFORMANCE AND BROADCASTING…”. This label used between April 1984 and 1987.

EMI reissued original Beatles albums in 1987, using DMM (Direct Metal Mastering) technology. First four albums were reissued in mono (“Please Please Me”, “With The Beatles”, “A Hard Day’s Night” and “Beatles For Sale”), other albums were reissued in stereo. Color EMI logos is changed to silver. The rimtext was again altered. Importantly, around the 11 ‘o’ clock position in the rimtext the wording is: “UNAUTHORISED COPYING, PUBLIC PERFORMANCE, BROADCASTING, HIRING AND RENTAL…”. Instead, added “MADE IN ENGLAND” text at the end of the perimeter print. This label used between 1987 and 1991.

Records with identical label design was reissued in 2003. This vinyl was manufactured by Haarlem, Holland. These records were made ​​by order of EMI and intended for export to England. The only difference is a dish effect underneath the labels impressed into the vinyl itself. Therefore, labels have identical “Made In England” text at the end of the perimeter print. Addition, some labels contain the number below the name. This number is identical to the barcode on the sleeve. But this is not English edition. In this edition there are many misprints and mispressings.

Parlophone started to use a newly disigned label in 1988. Parlophone radically changed their label design to silver print on a black background and removed EMI boxed logos. These labels have a silver Parlophone logo at the top. March 7, 1988, EMI issued new Beatles album “The Beatles Past Masters” with this new label design. This is the last Beatles album issued Parlofone Records on vinyl. The same design was used to re-release of “20 Greatest Hits”.

Parlophone Decoding.

Published July 16th, 2011

Trail of area markings.

Lacquers make Masters which in turn produce Mothers which then create Stampers. So for your Parlophone records, the Master is the matrix at the 6 o’clock position, the Mother is the number etched in the deadwax at the 9 o’clock location and the Stamper is identified by the letter(s) etched at the 3 o’clock postion. For the 3 o’clock position, Parlophone use the following coding: G R A M O P H L T D (Gramophone Ltd) where G=1, R=2, A=3, M=4, O=5, P=6, H=7, L=8, T=9 and D=0. Therefore, many times you will see more then one letter etched in the dead wax in the Stamper location (3 o’clock). For example, if “MM” is etched, it means the record was pressed with the 44th stamper. The ultimate early pressing of any Beatles Parlophone LP would be denoted with the codes 1/G 1/G (side 1 and side 2), where the “1” represents the first Mother (9 o’clock) and the “G” denotes the first Stamper (3 o’clock) or one of the first 300 off the press!

The picture below illustrates where to locate the information to date your Parlophone record:
1.Lacquer (Matrix or Master) (6 o’clock)
2.Mother produced from the Master (9 o’clock)
3.Stamper produced from the Mother (3 o’clock)

pmcmatrix.GIF

Tax code letters.

The tax code was pressed in the trail-off area (SP and EP) and embossed in the center of the label or printed on the label. The purchase tax was introduced during World War II and was a sort of “luxury tax”. As the tax percentage fluctuated, the tax code changed. The record companies introduced the new tax codes at specific dates but sometimes continued to use an old code even when they had introduced the new one. Tax code appearing in the sixties was WT, which referenced the 50% tax imposed effective August 1, 1960. This was changed to OT on July 26, 1961, when the tax was raised to 55%. The tax was lowered to 45% on April 10, 1962, at which time the code was changed to ZT. On November 26, 1962, the tax was re-imposed at 45% and assigned a PT code. The tax was lowered to 25% on January 1, 1963, leading to MT code. On July 1, 1963, the was re-imposed at 25% and the tax code changed to KT. Although the tax was raised to 27.5% on July 21, 1966, to 50% on March 20, 1968, and to 55% on November 23, 1968, the KT designation remained. On January 1, 1969, the code was changed to JT; however, EMI continued using the KT code while occasionally adding a J to form JKT.

First pressings of the “Please Please Me” album should have the MT tax cod in effect at the time it was pressed; however, black and gold label copies of the album normally have either ZT or WOZT. Later pressings have ZMT, MT, MKT or KT. All subsequent Parlophone albums should have and can be found with the KT code, but older codes are common. The MT codes appears on early pressings of “With The Beatles” through “Rubber Soul” and on some mono copies of “A Collection Of Beatles Oldies”. The MKT code is sometimes found on copies of “With The Beatles”. Later pressings of “Revolver” from 1969 have the JKT code. First pressings of “The White Album” have KT, later pressins have JKT. Some copies of “Let It Be” have KT.

ZT – April 10, 1962 – November 25, 1962.

PT – November 26, 1962 – December 31, 1962.

MT – Jenuary 1, 1963 – June 30, 1963.

KT – July 1, 1963 (used until 1972).

JT (JKT) – January 1, 1969 until December, 1969.

Can also find records with anomalies tax codes. Posible this is evidence that the record was made to change the tax code, but it went on sale after changing the tax code.

WOZT – SP “Love Me Do”, LP “Please Please Me”.

PZT, MPT – SP “Please Please Me”, later pressing SP “Love Me Do”.

ZMT, MPT, ZPMT – LP “Please Please Me”.

WKT – SP “Lady Madonna”.

Record number markings.

Parlophone started pressing LP’s before they associated with Capitol, so their numbering schemes are not related. Back then, “A”, “B”, “C”, and “D” were codes used to indicate the series that the record was in. You’ll find many Odeon-series Classical recordings with the prefix PMA. PMB’s were Odeon series records, too, but these were 10″ LP’s. PMC’s were popular records, comedy records, etc. — anything that wasn’t in the Odeon series (this included British artists). PMD’s were ten-inch versions of the kinds of records in the “C” series.

The “M” in the middle represented a Long Play album. The later-used “A” simply denoted an entirely different series; the “A” does not mean “Apple”. The Beatles’ first album, “Please Please Me”, had the catalog number PMC-1202. It was a Parlophone 12″ record in the series containing British artists.

“S” was used in the place of “M” for stereo albums, and this was placed at the end — apparently so as not to be mistaken for a different speed record. Originally, the PCS series was numbered differently from the PMC series, since not all records had both mono and stereo counterparts. Some record companies in the US had similar numbering conventions.

When Parlophone wanted to indicate that a record was an export album made in England and sent to another country, they used an additional letter at the beginning: “P” for “Parlophone” or “C” for “Capitol.” CPCS-101 was a British export of the American album, Something New. PPCS-7067/8 was a British export of the UK White Album to countries where the Apple trademark was not yet licensed.

The only prefixing created specifically for the Beatles while they were together was CORE, used on John’s “Live Peace in Toronto 1969” LP. It’s numbered CORE-2001; there were no other LP’s in the CORE series.

If another letter was used after PMC or PCS, this usually indicates that the record was MADE by a Parlophone affiliate in another country. This gets complicated, because if, for example, a Sweden-series record was used in another country, they’d KEEP the prefix of PMCS.

“G” = Greece
“H” = Holland (the Netherlands), not used during the Beatle period
“J” = South Africa
“L” = (unknown)
“M” = New Zealand
“O” = Australia
“Q” = Italy
“S” = Sweden

Please Please Me, Parlophone, PMC 1202.

Published July 16th, 2011

Please Please Me, Parlophone, PMC 1202, 03.22.63, mono. The Beatles FIRST official L.P. release. For the ONLY time, the mono version was issued 6 weeks BEFORE the stereo version. This album contained the “A” and “B” sides of their first two singles, plus 10 new songs. All recorded in one incredible session at Abbey Road. The session cost just Ј400 and lasted 16 hours.

The first pressing has Ernest J.Day & Co. front laminated cover, with large “mono” on front. The photo credit for the front cover: “Photo Angus McBean” is printed in the lower right corner. The text starts at the end of “s” in “songs”.

PPM 1st mono sleeve

1. First pressing. March 22, 1963. The first pressing has black label with gold print and “Parlophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print.  “Dick James Mus. Co” uncorrect publishing credit for “I Saw Her Standing There”, “Misery”, “Do You Want To Know A Secret” & “There’s A Place”. With or without tax code and with 33 1/3 on the label. Tax code variations: ZT, MT, ZMT. Polythene-lined “Use Emitex” die-cut inner sleeve. Matrix numbers: Side 1: XEX 421-1N; Side 2: XEX 422-1N.

Second label variation of the first pressing has a circular groove. This circular groove was the result of the use of the old stamp machines. This groove may appear on side 1 or side 2.

Crossover pressing. April, 1963. Crossover pressing has the side 1 as on the second pressing and the side 2 as on the first pressing.

2. Second pressing. April-May, 1963. Ernest J.Day & Co. front laminated cover, with large “mono” on front. Black label with gold print and “Parlophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print. “Northern Songs” correct publishing credit for “I Saw Her Standing There”, “Misery”, “Do You Want To Know A Secret” & “There’s A Place”. With or without tax code and with 33 1/3 on the label. Tax code variations: MT, ZMT. Polythene-lined “Use Emitex” die-cut inner sleeve. Matrix numbers: Side 1: XEX 421-1N; Side 2: XEX 422-1N.

The “Dick James” credits from the first pressing have now been altered to read “Northern Songs” instead. This change occurred very quickly as the typesetter for the credits wasn’t informed that the Beatles had worked with Dick James to set up their own, new, “Northern Songs” publishing company for Lennon and McCartney’s original songs. These copies are rarer than the first variation.

3. Third pressing, summer 1963. It is the first pressing on it is black-yellow Parlophone label. Ernest J.Day & Co. front laminated cover, with large “mono” on front. Black label with yellow logo and silver print. “The Parlophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print, but without “Recording first published 1963″. With or without small 33 1/3 prefix and with or without KT tax code on the label. Tracing-rice-paper-lined “Use Emitex” die-cut inner sleeve. Matrix numbers: Side 1: XEX 421-1N; Side 2: XEX 422-1N.

4. Fourth pressing, summer 1963 – January 1964. Garrod & Lofthouse Ltd. or Ernest J.Day & Co. front laminated cover, with large “mono” on front. Black label with yellow logo and silver print. “The Parlophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print and “Recording first published 1963″. Tracing-paper-lined “Use Emitex” die-cut inner sleeve. With or without KT tax code on the label. Matrix numbers: Side 1: XEX 421-1N; Side 2: XEX 422-1N.

Decca contract pressing, summer-autumn 1963. Garrod & Lofthouse Ltd. front laminated cover, with large “mono” on front. Black label with yellow logo and silver print. “The Parlophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print and “Recording first published 1963″. Tracing-paper-lined “Use Emitex” die-cut inner sleeve. These are distinguishing characteristics Decca:
1. There is no tax code around the centre hole on either side of the disc.
2. There’s a light ridge that runs around approximately 5mm out from the centre hole. This ridge is also 41mm in from the edge of the label.
3. The most promiment groove, which is a typical characteristic of Decca LP presses is approximately 31mm out from the centre hole and 15mm in from the edge of the label.
4. There is no tax code stamped at the 12 o’clock position.
5. The mother plate number (either single or double figured) is at the 9 o’clock position. There is no tx code stamped above it.
6. The contract pressings did NOT utilise the BUCKINGHAM stamper codes, so there are no such letters at the 3 o’clock position.
7. The matrix number is stamped at the 6 o’clock position in the deadwax.
Matrix numbers: Side 1: XEX 421-1N; Side 2: XEX 422-1N.

5. Fifth pressing, 1964. Garrod & Lofthouse Ltd. front laminated cover, with mid-sized “mono” on front. Black label with yellow logo and silver print. “The Parlophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print, “Recording first published 1963″ and “Sold in UK…” text. Tracing-paper-lined “Use Emitex” die-cut inner sleeve. With or without KT tax code on the label.

Attention! The existence of the fifth pressing mono version with similar labels have not been proven. This pressing is known in the stereo version only.

But however, it is known that the first edition with the matrix XEX 422-2N appeared in the early 1964. This edition had a labels similar to the labels fourth press. Perhaps, this is due to a large quantity of the labels made ​​earlier. We can assume that this edition may be the losted fifth pressing.

6. Sixth pressing, 1965 until 1969. Garrod & Lofthouse Ltd. front laminated cover, with small “mono” on front. Black label with yellow logo and silver print. “The Gramophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print and “Sold in UK…” text. Tracing-paper-lined “Use Emitex” die-cut or plaine white inner sleeves. With or without KT tax code on the label. Matrix numbers: Side 1: XEX 421-1N; Side 2: XEX 422-2N (On side 2 letter “N” is strongly pressed in the surface of the vinyl. This unique feature is possible to see on all later mono presses until 1982).

Variation A. Tracklist layout differs on both sides to preceding variations, with the major difference in this section being the absence of brackets around the publishing credits for each song. The album title text is also now a little larger than on previous copies. Of note, the paper used on the labels now has a different consistency and is more smooth than the slightly rough paper used on the older labels. This version of the label use Sans-serif print.

Variation B. The “1963” publishing date stamp is now indented, making it likely to have been introduced simultaneously with TNR font in late 1966.

Variation C. In late 1966, the typeset used on the “Please Please Me” label to have changed from Sans Serif to Times New Roman. The layout of the track listing was also re-arranged to incorporate the differing type size. Another minor difference is the increased spacing between the  1963 symbol and XEX 421 / XEX 422. This pressing can often be found with MT tax code on the Side 1.

7. Seventh pressing, summer 1969 until November 1969. Garrod & Lofthouse Ltd. front laminated cover, with small “mono” on front. Black label with yellow logo and silver print. “The Gramophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print. Plaine white or sepia “LP advertising” inner sleeve. Without tax code. Matrix numbers: Side 1: XEX 421-1N; Side 2: XEX 422-2N.

8. Eighth pressing, November 1969 until 1970. Black label with one black-white EMI logo and silver print. The Gramophone CO Ltd…” printed at the start perimeter print and “Made In GT. Britain” lower text. Laminated front flipback “Garrod & Lofthouse Ltd” sleeve with large “mono” on front. Sepia or black & white “LP advertising” inner sleeve. Matrix numbers: Side One: XEX 421-1N, Side Two: XEX 422-2N.

9. Ninth pressing, summer 1981 until August 1982. Black label with yellow Parlophone logo and silver print. “ALL RIGHTS OF THE PRODUCER…” printed at the start perimeter print. Importantly, around the 7 ‘o’ clock position in the rimtext the wording is: “…UNAUTHORISED PUBLIC PERFORMANCE, BROADCASTING, COPYING AND HIRING…”. “MANUFACTURED IN THE UK BY EMI RECORDS LIMITED” text at the end of the perimeter print. Unlaminated outer sleeve with large “mono” on front. White paper standard EMI inner sleeve. Matrix numbers: Side One: XEX 421-1N or -3, Side Two: XEX 422-2N.

10. Tenth pressing, 1987 – 1991. Black label with two silver EMI logos and silver print. “ALL RIGHTS OF THE PRODUCER…” printed at the start perimeter print. Importantly, around the 11 ‘o’ clock position in the rimtext the wording is: “UNAUTHORISED COPYING, PUBLIC PERFORMANCE, BROADCASTING, HIRING AND RENTAL…”. “MADE IN ENGLAND” text at the end of the perimeter print. Unlaminated outer sleeve with large “mono” on the front and with barcode on the back side. Sleeves early 90’s have Apple logo on the back side. Misprint matrix numbers on the both labels (YEX 94 and YEX 95). Matrix numbers: Side One: XEX 421-4-1-1 D, Side Two: XEX 422-3-1-1 D. Play mono.

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