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Published May 1st, 2007 | Edit |

This is a private records collection of The Beatles. The owner of this collection is sure that this site will provide lots of useful information for people interested in collecting of Beatles vinyl. Information - is the main purpose of the site, however some things will be released for sale. All rights reserved copying, broadcasting and the publication of materials from this site is possible from the sanction of the owner of the site only. The collection will be always updated.

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Parlophone 45 labels.

Published December 24th, 2011

Parlophone 45 label chronology.

Parlophone started new 45-R series in 1956, but EMI started to print the publishing year on the labels in 1957. It was printed as “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1957″ on the left side below the horizontal lines at the the center of the label. Between the record numbers 45-R 4949 and 45-R 4988, it possible to find singles where the words “MADE IN GT. BRITAIN” are not printed below the Parlophone logo. Parlophone changed to red labels in 1958 and used them until January 1963.

Parlophone started to use a completely new label design in January 1963. The new label was black and silver print, with a new logo and “45 R.P.M.” printed on the right side of the label. The “45-” prefix was temporarily saved. There are both labels with capitalized and non-capitalized perimeter print. These two label version were used concurrently. On some of the labels with capitalized perimeter print, the Parlophone logo is slightly reduced in size. Label used between January 1963 and March 1963.

Parlophone dropped the “45-” prefix in spring 1963. The publishing year was saved as “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1963″. There are both labels with capitalized and non-capitalized perimeter print. These two label version were used concurrently. Label used between March 1963 and January 1964.

The text “SOLD IN U.K. SUBJECT TO RESALE PRICE CONDITIONS, SEE PRICE LISTS” was printed on EMI records between February 1964 and June 1969. This wording was supposed to be on UK releases only, but it also appears frequently on exported records. The publishing year was saved as “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1963″. There are both labels with capitalized and non-capitalized perimeter print. These two label version were used concurrently. On some of the labels with capitalized perimeter print, the Parlophone logo is slightly reduced in size. In the beginning of 1964, the ratio between non-capitalized perimeter print singles and capitalized perimeter print singles was equal. After September 1964, almost all singles had a fully capitalized perimeter print. Label used between February 1964 and January 1965.

Parlophone started to print the publishing year as “(p) 1965″ in January 1965. Label has “THE PARLOPHONE” printed at the start of the perimeter print and “SOLD IN U.K….” text. This label was in use for a relatively short period of time before the perimeter print was changed. The text “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED was removed from the label. All of the singles released 1965 and onwards had capitalized perimeter print and the Parlophone logo slightly reduced in size. Label used between January 1964 and December 1965.

Parlophone ceased to be a limited company in its own right, to become a subsidiary of the parent Gramophone Company Ltd. on July 1, 1965. Because of this, the start of the perimeter print was changed to “THE GRAMOPHONE CO. LTD…”. The first of these labels appeared in October 1965. “SOLD IN U.K….” text was saved. Label used between October 1965 and July 1969.

The text “SOLD IN U.K. SUBJECT TO RESALE…” was removed from the label in July 1969. These labels used between July 1969 and late 1971.

EMI added their logo at the bottom of the labels in February 1972. EMI continued to release singles on the Parlophone label until early 1973. The tex “MADE IN GT. BRITAIN” was removed from the bottom of the label. Instead, added “MADE IN GT. BRITAIN” text at the end of the perimeter print. Label used between February 1972 and October 1980.

In October 1980 the rimtext was again slightly altered so that it started with “ALL RIGHTS OF THE PRODUCER…”. Importantly, around the 11 ‘o’ clock position in the rimtext the wording is: “…UNAUTHORISED PUBLIC PERFORMANCE, BROADCASTING, COPYING AND HIRING…”. Instead, added “MANUFACTURED IN THE UK BY EMI RECORDS LIMITED” text at the end of the perimeter print. This label used between October 1980 and October 1982 (“The Beatles Singles Collection, 1982”).

The final pressing has silver label with black textur print and logo. Rimtext embossed on the trail off area. The rimtext wording is: “UNAUTHORISED COPYING, HIRING, RENTING, PUBLIC PERFORMANCE AND BROADCASTING…”. This label used between end of the 80s and begin of the 90s.

Copyright information.

The N.C.B. label credit is believed to be an abbreviation of “Nordic Copyright Bureau” which is an organisation for collecting royalties on records sold in Norway and Sweden.

Push-out and solid centres.

The most common center for an EMI group 7″ record was the four-spoke push-out center. EMI decided in November 1966 to only press singles with solid centers. However, they continued to produce push-out center singles for “special purposes”. One of the these “special purposes” seemed to be export, another for use in jukeboxes. Some reports state that the ratio between push-out centers and solid centers were 20/1 at the beginning of 1967.

P.S. Other information about Parlophone you can look in the category “Parlophone UK Albums”.

Contract pressings.

Published December 24th, 2011

Sometimes EMI had problems to press enough records to keep up with the demand. To increase production they turned to other companies to press up some copies of a particular release, however, the majority of copies were pressed by EMI themselves.

Pressed by Oriole: “I Want To Hold Your Hand”, R 5084; “Can’t Buy Me Love”, R 5114.

Oriole had a very good pressing plant that was used by several different companies, especially EMI. Oriole pressings are usually mistaken for Pye pressings. The reason for this was that Pye had several of their hits pressed by Oriole. These are distinguishing characteristics Oriole pressing:
1. No tax code is evident in the push-out centre on either side of the disc.
2. The push-out centre has a rough texture to it.
3. There is one small ridge that’s approximately 0.5mm in from the edge of the push-out centre.
4. The gap between the push-out centre and the body of the disc is approximately 2.5mm wide.
5. The tax code can be found stamped into the deadwax at the 9 o’clock position.
6. The mother plate number is pressed directly underneath the tax code at the 9 o’clock position.
7. The matrix number is stamped at the 6 o’clock position in the deadwax.
8. There are no stramper code letters stamped into the deadwax at the 3 o’clock position.
9. The dinking around the edge of the label is twice the size of the EMI press at 2mm tall. The vinyl for these pressings is thicker and heavier than EMI or Decca pressings.

Pressed by CBS / Oriole: “I Feel Fine”, R 5200; “Hey Jude”, R 5722 (see Apple singles).

The Oriole record company had two record pressing factories, one situated in Aston Clinton and the other in Colnbrook. It lasted until 21 September 1964, when it was bought by CBS, parent of the American Columbia Records, who were looking to set up their own manufacturing facility in the UK. The result was CBS Records, and with its coming the Oriole label would be phased out. The company was officially renamed CBS Records in 1965. These are its distinguishing characteristics:
1. There is no tax code around the centre hole on either side of the disc.
2. The ridge is approximately 12.5mm out from the centre hole.
3. The gap between the push-out center and the body of the disc is approximately 2.5mm.
4. There is an outer ring on the very edge of the label (which, as a whole, is textured) that runs from the edge to just 2-3mm in. This is the only smooth part of the label. This outer ring has been highlighted in the close-up underneath.
5. The tax code can be found at the 12 o’clock position.
6. The mother plate number (either single or double figured) is at the 9 o’clock position.
7. There are no stamper code letters stamped into the deadwax at the 3 o’clock position.
8. The matrix number is stamped at the 6 o’clock position in the deadwax.

Pressed by Decca: “She Loves You”, R 5055; “I Want To Hold Your Hand”, R 5084; “I Feel Fine”, R 5200; “Help”, R 5305; “Hello Goodbye”, R 5655; “Hey Jude”, R 5722 (see Apple singles).

Decca did many contract pressings during the 60s, mainly for EMI. Typical of the Decca single is the larger space between the center and the rest of the label compared to an EMI pressing. The pressing ring of the center is also smaller and deeper on Decca pressing compared to an EMI pressing. These are distinguishing characteristics Decca:
1. No tax code is evident in the push-out centre on either side of the disc.
2. The ridge is approximately 2.5mm in from the edge of the push-out centre, or 10mm from the center hole.
3. There is a second lighter ridge that is approximately 0.5mm in from the edge of the push-out centre.
4. The gap between the push-out centre and the body of the disc is approximately 2.5mm wide.
5. The tax code on every Decca contract pressing can be found at the 12 o’clock position. ‘I Want To Hold Your Hand’ however has the tax code pressed at the 9 o’clock position.
6. The mother plate number (either single or double figured) is pressed directly underneath the tax code at the 9 o’clock position. However, one or two very rare Decca presses have been discovered that omit this number.
7. The contract pressings did NOT utilise the BUCKINGHAM stamper codes, so there are no such letters at the 3 o’clock position.
8. The matrix number can be found at the 6 o’clock position.

Pressed by Philips: “Hey Jude”, R 5722 (see Apple singles).

Philips did a lot of contract pressings including almost all records released by CBS before 1965. Records with push-out centers pressed by Philips are very ease to recognise because of the centers with three “spokes. These are its distinguishing characteristics:
1. There is no tax code is evident in the push-out centre on either side of the disc.
2. There is a double ridge (1mm apart) that runs around approximately 1mm in from the edge of the pushout centre. It’s 11mm out from the centre hole and approximately 28mm in from the edge of the label.
3. The gap between the push-out centre and the body of the disc is approximately 2.5mm.
4. The tax code can be found at the 12 o’clock position.
5. The mother plate number (either single or double figured) can be found at the 9 o’clock position.
6. There are no stamper code letters stamped into the deadwax at the 3 o’clock position.
7. The matrix number can be found at the 6 o’clock position.

Pressed by Pye: “Hey Jude”, R 5722 (see Apple singles).

Pye probably had a limited capacity to press records, because there are a lot of contract-pressed Pye records and almost no records contract-pressed by them. However, one of the reasons why so few contract pressings by Pye have been found could be because of the similarity to Decca pressings. These are its distinguishing characteristics:
1. There is no tax code around the centre hole on either side of the disc.
2. The ridge is approximately 2.5mm in from the edge of the push-out centre or about 10mm out from the center hole.
3. The secondary ridge runs right on the very edge next to the triangular centre attachments. You can only see a second ridge at the base of these triangular shapes and *extremely* flush against the edge gap, whereas on the Decca discs this ridge is clearly visible around the extreme edge rim of the pushout section. This is consistent with all Decca and Pye discs.
4. The gap between the push-out centre and the main body of the disc is approximately 2.25mm.
5. The tax code can be found at the 12 o’clock position.
6. The mother plate number (either single or double figured) is at the 9 o’clock position.
7. A hand-etched letter has been scratched in at the 3 o’clock position. This does NOT appear on the Decca contract pressings.

P.S. All EMI singles with solid centers pressed before 1966 are contract pressings.

Parlophone company sleeves.

Published December 21st, 2011

The changes in company sleeve designs were similar to those of the other EMI labels and the changes between the different designs occurred at approximately the same times.

Type 1 sleeve. Blue, red, yellow and green multicolored sleeve designed in the late 50s to be used with the red label. Used from 1958 until 1963 with Parlophone series 45-R 4441 – 45-R 4988 including The Beatles singles 45-R 4949 “Love Me Do” and 45-R 4983 “Please Please Me”.

Type 2 sleeve. Multicolored striped sleeve. Used during the early 60s until 1963 with with Parlophone series 45-R 4441 – 45-R 4988 including The Beatles singles 45-R 4949 “Love Me Do” and 45-R 4983 “Please Please Me”.

There are some sleeves of Type 2 where the box with the Parlophone logo and the text “THIS RECORD MUST BE PLAYED AT 45 R.P.M.” is missing.

Type 3 sleeve. Dark green sleeve with white print and straight top. When Parlophone started with the silver & black labels they also redesigned their company sleeves. EMI introduced their record tokens on this sleeve and the price was 6/- to 50/-. Used from January 1963 to summer 1964 with Parlophone series R 4989 – R 5222 including The Beatles singles R 5015 “From Me To You”, R 5055 “She Loves You”, R 5084 “I Want To Hold Your Hand”, R 5114 “Can’t Buy Me Love”, R 5160 “A Hard Day’s Night” and R 5200 “I Feel Fine”.

Type 4 sleeve. Dark green sleeve with white print and wave top. The price for the EMI record tokens was 6/- to 50/- on the sleeve. Used from summer 1964 until November 1964 with Parlophone series R 5103 – R 5222 including The Beatles singles R 5114 “Can’t Buy Me Love”, R 5160 “A Hard Day’s Night” and R 5200 “I Feel Fine”.

Type 5 sleeve. Green sleeve with Parlophone and globe EMI logo. The copyright text below the logos is “TRADE MARK OF THE PARLOPHONE CO. LTD”. The price for the EMI record tokens was 6/- to 50/- on the sleeve. Used from November 1964 until autumn 1965 with Parlophone series R 5103 – R 5389 including The Beatles singles R 5200 “I Feel Fine”, R 5265 “Ticket To Ride” and R 5305 “Help!”.

Type 6 sleeve. Green sleeve with Parlophone and globe EMI logo. The copyright text below the logos is “TRADE MARK OF THE GRAMOPHONE CO. LTD”. The price for the EMI record tokens was 6/- to 50/- on the sleeve. Used from autumn 1965 until late 1965 with Parlophone series R 5225 – R 5788 including The Beatles single R 5389 “We Can Work It Out”.

Type 7 sleeve. Green sleeve with black Parlophone logo and “Fran The Fan” advertisement on the back. Three different “Fran The Fan” cartoons in green and black advertise Morphy-Richards hair products on the back of the sleeves. The price for the EMI record tokens was 6/- to 50/- on the sleeve. Used from late 1965 until 1968 with Parlophone series R 5225 – R 5788 including The Beatles singles R 5389 “We Can Work It Out”, R 5452 “Paperback Writer”, R 5493 “Eleanor Rigby”, R 5620 “All You Need Is Love”, R 5655 “Hello Goodbye” and R 5675 “Lady Madonna”.

First version:

Second version:

Third version:

Type 8 sleeve. Green sleeve with green Parlophone logo on the front and “Miners” advertisement on the back. The price for the EMI record tokens was 6/- to 50/- on the sleeve. Used from late 1965 until 1968 with Parlophone series R 5225 – R 5788 including The Beatles singles R 5452 “Paperback Writer”, R 5493 “Eleanor Rigby”, R 5620 “All You Need Is Love”, R 5655 “Hello Goodbye” and R 5675 “Lady Madonna”.

Type 9 sleeve. Green sleeve with green Parlophone logo on the front and “Miners” advertisement on the back. The price for the EMI record tokens was 7/3 to 50/- on the sleeve. Used from 1966 until 1968 with Parlophone series R 5357 – R 5788 including The Beatles singles R 5452 “Paperback Writer”, R 5493 “Eleanor Rigby”, R 5620 “All You Need Is Love”, R 5655 “Hello Goodbye” and R 5675 “Lady Madonna”.

Type 10 sleeve. Green sleeve with green Parlophone logo on the front and “Miners” advertisement on the back. The price for the EMI record tokens was 7/3 to 50/- on the sleeve. Used from 1966 until 1968 with Parlophone series R 5357 – R 5788 including The Beatles singles R 5452 “Paperback Writer”, R 5493 “Eleanor Rigby”, R 5620 “All You Need Is Love”, R 5655 “Hello Goodbye” and R 5675 “Lady Madonna”.

Type 11 sleeve. Green sleeve with Parlophone and globe EMI logo. The copyright text below the logos is “TRADE MARK OF THE GRAMOPHONE CO. LTD”. The price for the EMI record tokens was 7/3- to 50/- on the sleeve. Used from 1966 until 1968 with Parlophone series R 5357 – R 5788 including The Beatles singles R 5452 “Paperback Writer”, R 5493 “Eleanor Rigby”, R 5620 “All You Need Is Love”, R 5655 “Hello Goodbye” and R 5675 “Lady Madonna”.

Type 12 sleeve. Green sleeve with Parlophone and swirl. These were at least two different backsides used this sleeve design, advertising different LPs. Used from 1968 with Parlophone series R 5357 – R 5931 including The Beatles singles re-issued 1969.

First version:

Second version:

Love Me Do / P.S. I Love You, Parlophone R 4949.

Published December 20th, 2011

1. First pressing, 45-R 4949, October 5, 1962.  The Beatles first single was released on October 5, 1962. The Beatles first entered EMI Studios on Abbey Road on June 6, 1962, when the band’s lineup was John Lennon on rhythm guitar, Paul McCartney on bass, George Harrison on lead guitar and Pete Best on drums. Four songs were recorded that day: “Besame Mucho”, “Love Me Do”, “P.S. I Love You” and “Ask Me Why”. In August, 1962, Pete Best was fired and replaced by Ringo Starr. On September 4, 1962, the Beatles returned to Abbey Road to record their first single. The Beatles recorded a number of takes of “Love Me Do” and, much against their wishes, “How Do You Do It”. Ringo played drums. On September 11, 1962, the Beatles recorded “Love Me Do”, “P.S. I Love You” and “Please Please Me”, which features Paul on lead vocal and bass, supported by John and George on backing vocals and guitars. Andy White, the drummer of the studio, plays the drums. Ringo played tambourine and maracas. But on the first pressings used the version of “Love Me Do” with Ringo’s drumming recorded on September 4.

The records were housed in Type 1 or Type 2 company sleeves. Red label with silver print. Catalog number with 45 prefix. These labels have “PARLOPHONE” in large stylized letters at the top and the Parlophone £ logo at 3 o’clock. The publishing year was printed on the label, as “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1962″. Red label pressings can be found with ZT, WOZT, MPZT or PT tax code. Matrix numbers: Side A: 7XCE 17144-1N, Side B: 7XCE 17145-1N.

Type 1 labels have “MADE IN GT. BRITAIN” printed below the Parlophone £ logo:

Type 2 labels do not have “MADE IN GT. BRITAIN”:

2. Second pressing, R 4949, autumn 1963. Standard procedure at Abbey Road Studios at the time was to erase the original two-track session tape for singles once they had been “mixed down” to the (usually monaural) master tape used to press records. This was the fate of two Beatles singles (four songs): “Love Me Do”, “P.S. I Love You”, “She Loves You”, and “I’ll Get You”. However, at some point the mixdown master tape for this song was also lost, and apparently no backup copies had been made. Thus, for many years the only extant recorded copies were the red label Parlophone 45 rpm vinyl records pressed in 1962. By the time the tapes had disappeared, the song’s 11 September 1962 remake featuring Andy White had been released. EMI would not have been too concerned about the loss of the 4 September take, therefore, as it was now considered obsolete, and they may not have anticipated ever having any use for it again anyway.

The original tape of ‘Love Me Do.’ It was removed at the time the Beatles’ Hits EP came out (August-September 1963). Therefore, for the second press “Love Me Do” was used Andy White version. In 1967, when Ringo’s version was discontinued from the EMI catalog, the lacquer, mother, and all stampers for the UK 45 were destroyed, thus making it impossible to press any further first-generation releases.

Black label with silver print. The publishing year was printed on the label, as “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1962″. “Parlophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print. Can be found with PT, MT, MPT or KT tax code. Push-out center. Matrix numbers: Side A: 7XCE 17144-1N, Side B: 7XCE 17145-1N.

3. Third pressing, R 4949, 1964. Black label with silver print. The publishing year was printed on the label, as “RECORDING FIRST PUBLISHED 1962″ and “SOLD IN U.K. SUBJECT TO RESALE PRICE CONDITIONS, SEE PRICE LISTS” text. Tax code KT. Push-out center. Matrix numbers: Side A: 7XCE 17144-1N, Side B: 7XCE 17145-1N.

Type 1 labels have “Parlophone Co. Ltd.” printed at the start perimeter print:

Type 2 labels have a fully capitalized “PARLOPHONE CO. LTD.” printed at the start perimeter print and PARLOPHONE TRADEMARK logo’s are now smaller:

4. Fourth pressing, R 4949, March 6, 1976. From “The Beatles’ Singles Collection 1962-1970″ box set (BS-24). These pressings have original top-opening sleeve with green front and pictures back.

Black label with silver EMI logo and silver print. “THE EMI RECORDS LTD…” printed at the start perimeter print and “MADE IN GT BRITAIN” printed at the end of the perimeter print. Publishing year printed as: (p) 1962. Matrix numbers: Side A: 7XCE 17144-2, Side B: 7XCE 17145-2.

5. Fifth pressing, October 5, 1982. 20th Anniversary edition “Special 12″Single Featuring Rare Recording Of “love Me Do”, Parlophone 12R4949. The single contains both versions of “Love Me Do” recorded on September 4 and September 11, 1962. These pressings have original side-opening pictures sleeve.

Matrix numbers: Side 1: 12R4949 A-1-1-1 / Side 2: 12R4949 B-1-1-1.

6. Sixth pressing, 45-R 4949, December 6, 1982. From “The Beatles Singles Collection” blue box set (BSCP-1). These pressings have original top-opening pictures sleeve.

Returned at the old style. Red label with silver print. These labels have “PARLOPHONE” in large stylized letters at the top and side numbers as ‘A’ SIDE and ‘B’ SIDE‘A’ SIDE and ‘B’ SIDE and PRODUCED BY GEORGE MARTIN credit. “Manufactured In The UK by EMI Records…” printed at the start perimeter print. Matrix numbers: Side A: 7XCE 17144-2, Side B: 7XCE 17145-2.

7. Seventh pressing beginning of the 90s. Same top-opening pictures sleeve as 6th pressing, but with bar code on the reverse.

The final pressing has silver label with black textur print and logo. Rimtext embossed on the trail off area. The rimtext wording is: “UNAUTHORISED COPYING, HIRING, RENTING, PUBLIC PERFORMANCE AND BROADCASTING…”. Matrix numbers: Side A: 7XCE 17144-2-1-Q1, Side B: 7XCE 17145-2-1-Q1.  Late pressing: 7XCE 17144-5-1-Q2 / 7XCE 17145-3-1-Q2.

8. Eighth pressing October 5, 2012. Parlophone R4949/R4714 (5099901740172). Issue and released as a limited edition to mark the 50th Anniversary of the original release on 5 October 1962. This is a replica of the original single in the original colourful “beach towel” Parlophone company sleeve. The audio is taken from the mono remaster of 2009. This is a replica of the original single in the original colourful “beach towel” Parlophone company sleeve. The sleeve is made of a cardboard and has a bar code in difference from the paper original.

Variation A. Andy White mispressing, October 5, 2012. Issued to record dealers in the week commencing 1st October for official release on 5th October, the single was then recalled by EMI when it was discovered they had mistakenly used the version of Love Me Do that features Andy White on drums, and had erroneously used catalogue number R 4714 on the B Side (R 4714 belongs to a 1960 Matt Monro release). EMI apparently announced that it was under strict instructions from The Beatles’ Apple label to destroy copies of the single.

Matrix numbers (hand etched): Side A: BC88258-01A1  0174017, Side B: BC88258-01B1  0174017.

Variation B. Ringo pressing, October 22, 2012. EMI reissued the single on 22nd October with the version of Love Me Do that features Ringo on drums, although the B Side still carries the wrong catalogue number R 4714. Not clearly why so it turned out after all labels obviously were reprinted. This release has shinier/glossier silver print on the label which is much clearer.

Matrix numbers (hand etched): Side A: BC91232-01A1  0174017, Side B: BC88258-01B1  0174017.

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